Africans in Colonial Louisiana: The Development of Afro-Creole Culture in the Eighteenth Century

TitleAfricans in Colonial Louisiana: The Development of Afro-Creole Culture in the Eighteenth Century
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication1992
AuthorsHall, Gwendolyn Midlo
Number of Pages434
PublisherLouisiana State University Press
CityBaton Rouge
Abstract

This foundational study explores the history and development of the distinctive ethnic, linguistic, religious, and folklore practices of enslaved Africans that produced the Afro-Creole culture of colonial Louisiana. For Midlo-Hall, culture is inextricably interwoven with social and economic life as well as violence and warfare--whether the French slave trade, intra-African conflict, rivalries among empires, or slave resistance, from maronnage, to the Natchez revolt, and the Pointe Coupee conspiracies of 1791 and 1795. As she writes: “In the Americas, new cultures were formed through intense, and often violent, contacts among peoples of varied nations, races, classes, languages, and traditions” (pg. xiii). Grounded in an exploration of the African roots of creole cultural practices, her work reveals the interactions of Native peoples with those of European and African descent, uncovering the roots of an enduring creole culture. 

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277868132

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